The Role of Testing and QA in Agile Software Development

In our development group at Talis We’ve been thinking a lot about how to test more effectively in an agile environment. One of my colleagues, sent me a link to this excellent talk by Scott Ambler which examines the Role of Testing and QA in Agile Software Development.

Much of the talk is really an introduction to Agile Development which is beneficial to listen to because Scott dispels some of the myths around agile, and offers his own views on best practises using some examples. It does get a bit heated around the 45 minute mark when he’s discussing Database Refactoring, some of the people in the audience were struggling with the idea he was presenting which I felt was fairly simple. If you really want to skip all that try to forward to the 50 minute mark where he starts talking about sandboxes. What I will say is that if your having difficulty getting Agile accepted into your organisation then this might be a video you want to show your managers since it covers all the major issues and benefits.

Here’s some of the tips he has with regard to testing and improving quality:

  • Do Test Driven Development, the unit tests are the detailed design, they force developers to think about the design. Call it Just-in-time design.
  • Use Continuous Integration to build and run unit tests on each check-in to trunk.
  • Acceptance Tests are primary artefacts. Don’t bother with a requirements document simply maintain the acceptance test since the reality is that all testing teams will do is take that requirement and copy it into an acceptance test, so why introduce a traceability issue when you don’t need it. http://www.agilemodeling.com/essays/singleSourceInformation.htm
  • Use Standards and Guidelines to help ensure teams are creating consistent artefacts.
  • Code Reviews and Inspections are not a best practise. They are used to compensate for people working alone, not sharing their work, not communicating, poor teamwork, and poor collaboration. Guru checks output is an anti-pattern. Working together, pairing, good communication, teamwork should negate the need for code reviews and inspections.
  • Short feedback loop is extremely important. The faster you can get testing results and feedback from stakeholders the better.
  • Testers need to be flexible, willing to pick up new skills, need to be able to work with others. They need to be generalising specialists. The trend that is emerging in agile or the emerging belief is that there is no need for traditional testers.

Scott is a passionate speaker and very convincing, some of the points he makes are quite controversial yet hard to ignore – especially his argument that traditional testers are becoming less necessary. I’m not sure I agree with all his views yet he has succeeded in forcing me to challenge my own views which I need to mull over and for that reason alone watching his talk has been invaluable.

One thought on “The Role of Testing and QA in Agile Software Development

  1. I’m impressed, I have to admit. Seldom do I encounter a blog that’s both equally educative and interesting,
    and let me tell you, you have hit the nail on the head. The issue is an issue that not enough men and women are
    speaking intelligently about. I’m very happy I found this during my hunt for something regarding this.

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